My fondest dream is that it will be the date movie that breaks up couples nationwide. Maybe people will walk out of there and think, ‘Maybe not. I don’t know if I know you well enough.’
Gillian Flynn on Gone Girl (2014)

hernan bas

hernan bas

keyframedaily:

"Alternating between the metaphysical and the mundane throughout a wildly prodigious career—from radical German precursor to virtual global brand—Werner Herzog has chronicled if not carved out humankind’s tempestuous wasteland with the same sense of bravado and folly that haunt his protagonists. Indeed, Herzog is the duke of a ‘horrific sublime,’ the Nicolas Poussin of cinema whose seasons are all flush with cruelty, both natural and manmade. His 1971 documentary Land of Silence and Darkness is considered quintessential ‘early’ Herzog, meaning it probably evinces an ambitious ideological underpinning cut with a stark humility in relation to its conception; verité meets otherworldly. Situated chronologically next to his hallucinatory sci fi doc Fata Morgana (1971), Land of Silence and Darkness is a considerably more conventional reportage, within which however there is an implicit metaphysical consideration of the mundane. Or, rather, that the mundane is simply that which we haven’t yet penetrated with sufficient, emphatic inquiry.”
Jay Kuehner.

keyframedaily:

"Alternating between the metaphysical and the mundane throughout a wildly prodigious career—from radical German precursor to virtual global brand—Werner Herzog has chronicled if not carved out humankind’s tempestuous wasteland with the same sense of bravado and folly that haunt his protagonists. Indeed, Herzog is the duke of a ‘horrific sublime,’ the Nicolas Poussin of cinema whose seasons are all flush with cruelty, both natural and manmade. His 1971 documentary Land of Silence and Darkness is considered quintessential ‘early’ Herzog, meaning it probably evinces an ambitious ideological underpinning cut with a stark humility in relation to its conception; verité meets otherworldly. Situated chronologically next to his hallucinatory sci fi doc Fata Morgana (1971), Land of Silence and Darkness is a considerably more conventional reportage, within which however there is an implicit metaphysical consideration of the mundane. Or, rather, that the mundane is simply that which we haven’t yet penetrated with sufficient, emphatic inquiry.”

Jay Kuehner.

heidisaman:

"The critics and the public wanted the pathos of M. Hulot’s Holiday and Mon oncle. They got Playtime, a comedy entirely devoted to space, in which Tati, as Hulot, hovers at the periphery of his own creation and has the elegance, which very few comedians share, not to put the spotlight on his own mug. The public and the critics turned against Tati. They were of course wrong, and the film is one of those few that get better by the year. It’s a silent film with sound; its color scheme is in a narrow band between gray and blue that aggressively underscores the painterly logic of Tati’s conceit. The film gives itself the luxury to reinvent choreography and as such dazzles with the megalomania of its enterprise and the diabolical precision the filmmaker had to conjure up to pull it off.”
— Jean-Pierre Gorin on Tati’s Playtime 
Still from Playtime (1967, dir. Jacques Tati)

heidisaman:

"The critics and the public wanted the pathos of M. Hulot’s Holiday and Mon oncle. They got Playtime, a comedy entirely devoted to space, in which Tati, as Hulot, hovers at the periphery of his own creation and has the elegance, which very few comedians share, not to put the spotlight on his own mug. The public and the critics turned against Tati. They were of course wrong, and the film is one of those few that get better by the year. It’s a silent film with sound; its color scheme is in a narrow band between gray and blue that aggressively underscores the painterly logic of Tati’s conceit. The film gives itself the luxury to reinvent choreography and as such dazzles with the megalomania of its enterprise and the diabolical precision the filmmaker had to conjure up to pull it off.”

— Jean-Pierre Gorin on Tati’s Playtime 

Still from Playtime (1967, dir. Jacques Tati)

Anonymous said:
You liked Locke, correct? Tom Hardy is my favorite actor and I've heard he's excellent in it so I was thinking of watching it tonight. I would just love to hear what you have to say about it because I really value your opinion.

Indeed, I thought it was thoroughly enjoyable. I’m a huge fan of minimalist storytelling (both time and space-wise), so Locke felt practically tailor-made for me.

It’s a deceptively simple stunt – one man, one car, one hands-free cell phone device – but its complexities kick in almost immediately. In less talented hands, the film would’ve probably been unwatchable, but Hardy is an onion of acting, offering layers upon layers of inner life. Being confined to a microscopic canvas does nothing to reduce the vastness of his performance - more than ever before, his face and voice are like finely-tuned instruments, subtle but wholly effective and satisfying. And the same goes for the other actors in the film, who arguably have an even more difficult task: being without being seen. To be able to conjure personality, personal history, through voice alone is a dramatic test that I don’t think many could pass as successfully as the actors here have. My hat’s off to all of them.

I should also mention that it’s a surprisingly intense movie. Because we are trapped in that car for the duration of the entire film, there is never any relief for our tension. There are no other sets, no other characters we can focus our attention on, nothing that can really distract you from the moral struggle at hand. Instead the tension builds up continuously to almost claustrophobic levels.

Overall, I found it superbly acted, and competently written and directed. It’s not a film I plan to ever rewatch, but the experience I had with it was nothing if not highly entertaining.

(and thank you! I don’t think my opinions are of much worth or heavy on insights, but it’s lovely to know that someone can find them of some interest anyway)

©